Copy of OSHA Trade Release

Copy of the April 30, 2018 OSHA Trade Relase re: Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses electronically. For more info go to OSHA.gov.

Trade Release

Department of Labor, United States of America

U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Office of Communications
Washington, D.C.
www.osha.gov

For Immediate Release
April 30, 2018
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

U.S. Department of Labor Fixes Error Dating to 2016 Implementation of “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses” Regulation

WASHINGTON, DC – Following a review of the requirements put in place in 2016 regarding the “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses” regulation, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has taken action to correct an error that was made with regard to implementing the final rule.

OSHA determined that Section 18(c)(7) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, and relevant OSHA regulations pertaining to State Plans, require all affected employers to submit injury and illness data in the Injury Tracking Application (ITA) online portal, even if the employer is covered by a State Plan that has not completed adoption of their own state rule.

OSHA immediately notified State Plans and informed them that for Calendar Year 2017 all employers covered by State Plans will be expected to comply. An employer covered by a State Plan that has not completed adoption of a state rule must provide Form 300A data for Calendar Year 2017.  Employers are required to submit their data by July 1, 2018. There will be no retroactive requirement for employers covered by State Plans that have not adopted a state rule to submit data for Calendar Year 2016.

A notice has been posted on the ITA website and related OSHA webpages informing stakeholders of the corrective action.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

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OSHA watch — Premium Reduction Center Blog

Temporary enforcement policy on monorail hoists in construction Employers whose monorail hoists fail to comply with requirements in the Crane and Derricks in Construction Standard will not be issued citations as long as they adhere to other regulations, according to a recent memorandum. The temporary enforcement policy notes stakeholders identified gaps in the standard regarding […]

via OSHA watch — Premium Reduction Center Blog

NO LIFEGUARD ON DUTY

Prevention is Better than Treatment 

Scan 8Now that most people spend a lot of their time doing repetitive motions, such as Gaming, Facebooking,  Twittering, using social media and all other types of interactions with computers,  musculoskeletal disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, can happen outside the workplace.

You do not want to end up in pain for the rest of your life, so remember to take a break at least every hour from typing activities.

If you must spend your day sitting, as some people do, such as stenographers, remember to stand up at least once every hour.  While sitting, try to maintain your lumbar curve.  In other words, don’t slouch.

Scan 9
Twin stenographers sitting on Buttpillows, Patented Ergonomic Seating Cushions.

Sitting and the Prostate

Standing frequently throughout the day is especially important for men.  There is new research that links prolonged sitting to swelling of the prostate or prostatitis, and there is also research that links prostatitis to prostate cancer.  Prostatitis can affect the sexual health of men usually beginning at about the age of 50; so all you men out there, stand up at least once every hour.

 

Ergonomics: Standards

On July 20, 2001, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited President George W. Bush’s March 20, 2001, statement as follows:  “The safety and health of our Nation’s workforce is a priority for my administration.  Together we will pursue a comprehensive approach to ergonomics that addresses the concerns surrounding the ergonomics rule repealed today.  We will work with the Congress, the business community, and our Nation’s workers to address this important issue.”

It further states, “With these words, President Bush signed a joint resolution of Congress disapproving OSHA’s ergonomics standard, and at the same time, pledging to find a solution to ergonomic-related problems affecting the nation’s workforce.  OSHA’s ergonomics program standard was issued November 14, 2000, and took effect January 16, 2001.  Congress acted under authority of the Congressional Review Act of 1996.  As a result, the standard is no longer in effect, and employers and workers are not bound by its requirements.”

Today, I checked out OSHA’s web site and it makes no mention of the ergonomics standard being repealed.  It may be part of Obama Care; that is just my guess.  In fact, it is now referred to as the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 with amendments through 2004.

Bottom line is any employers should evaluate their workers for musculoskeletal disorders before they are hired so that they are not found to have an unsafe workplace that causes ergonomic injuries.

Further, for existing employees, if a person has any musculoskeletal pain, go to OSHA.gov to report any Work-related Injuries and Illnesses on their on-line Form 300 (Rev.01/2004) to be on the safe side.  Under OSHA’s General Duty clause, employers can be audited for not reporting a Work-related MSD; but as long as the employer reports the MSD (musculoskeletal disorder), they cannot get audited under the General Duty Clause for not reporting said MSD.  Employers can also call 1-800-321-OSHA to report any potential MSD’s that could be Work-related to make sure you are OSHA compliant.