OSHA News

OSHA Safe and Sound Week

U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Office of Communications
202-693-1999
Department of Labor, United States of America
Mark Your Calendars!
Safe + Sound Week 2018 to be held August 13 – 19

Safe and Sound Week 2018 logo
We are pleased to announce the date for the 2018 Safe + Sound Week, August 13-19.

The second annual Safe + Sound Week is a nationwide effort to raise awareness of the value of workplace safety and health programs. These programs can help employers and workers identify and manage workplace hazards before they cause injury or illness, improving a company’s financial bottom line.

Throughout this week, organizations are encouraged to host events and activities that showcase the core elements of an effective safety and health program, including: management leadership, worker participation, and finding and fixing workplace hazards.

Visit the Safe + Sound Week webpage for more information and stay tuned for additional updates, resources, and webinars to help prepare you for Safe + Sound Week!

SHOW your commitment by sharing the save the date graphic on social media using #safeandsound2018.

For More Information go to http://www.dol.gov

If you belong to a membership organization, nonprofit organization, or educational institution, there is an opportunity to partner with OSHA on the campaign. Individual businesses can also become campaign supporters. Neither partnering nor supporting the campaign has a financial obligation. Contact safeandsoundcampaign@dol.gov to become a partner or business supporter.

Thank you for receiving updates from the Safe + Sound Campaign.

Organized by:

Safe and Sound Week 2018 organizers
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U.S. Department of Labor news materials are accessible at http://www.dol.gov. The department’s Reasonable Accommodation Resource Center converts departmental information and documents into alternative formats, which include Braille and large print. For alternative format requests, please contact the department at (202) 693-7828 (voice) or (800) 877-8339 (federal relay).

OSHA Revised Whistleblower Complaint

Trade Release

Department of Labor, United States of America

U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Office of Communications
Washington, D.C.
www.osha.gov

For Immediate Release
July 28, 2017
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

OSHA revises its online whistleblower complaint form

WASHINGTON – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration recently revised its online whistleblower complaint form to help users file a complaint with the appropriate agency. The form provides workers with another option for submitting retaliation complaints to the U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA.

The updated form guides individuals as they file a complaint through the process, providing essential questions at the beginning so they can better understand and exercise their rights under relevant laws. One significant improvement to the system includes pop-up boxes with information about various agencies for individuals who indicate that they have engaged in protected activity that may be addressed by an agency other than OSHA. The new form is available in English and Spanish.

“Workers who report unsafe conditions and wrongdoing have a range of legal protections from retaliation,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt. “The revised online complaint form works to ensure whistleblowers file their complaints with the appropriate federal agency for prompt action.”

In addition to the online form, workers can file complaints by fax, mail, or hand-delivery; contacting the agency at 800-321-6742; or calling an OSHA regional or area office.

OSHA enforces the whistleblower provisions of 22 statutes protecting employees who report violations of various securities laws, trucking, airline, nuclear power, pipeline, environmental, rail, public transportation, workplace safety and health, and consumer protection laws. Detailed information on employee whistleblower rights, including fact sheets, is available online at http://www.whistleblowers.gov/.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

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OSHA Resources on Silica Final Rule

Information from OSHA

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U.S. Department of Labor

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Office of Communications

202-693-1999

Department of Labor, United States of America

New and revised resources available from OSHA on silica final rule

OSHA has released two resources to help small business employers comply with the agency’s final silica rule. The Small Entity Compliance Guide for General Industry and Maritime outlines steps that employers are required to take including: assessing worker exposures; using engineering and work practice controls to keep exposures below a specified safety threshold; offering medical exams to certain highly exposed workers; and training workers. Enforcement of the final rule is scheduled to begin June 23, 2018.

Released earlier in the year, the Small Entity Compliance Guide for Construction describes requirements to protect employees including: using engineering controls specified in the standard or selecting other effective engineering controls to reduce exposures; offering medical exams to workers who will need to wear a respirator under the silica standard for 30 or more days a year; and training workers. The guide was updated to reflect the new enforcement date of Sept. 23, 2017.

You are receiving this email because you signed up for updates on the agency’s silica rule. To unsubscribe, see below.

OSHA Whistleblower Complaints Contact Office of Communications

Trade Release from OSHA

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

Trade Release

Department of Labor, United States of America

U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Office of Communications
Washington, D.C.
www.osha.gov

For Immediate Release
July 28, 2017
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

OSHA revises its online whistleblower complaint form

WASHINGTON – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration recently revised its online whistleblower complaint form to help users file a complaint with the appropriate agency. The form provides workers with another option for submitting retaliation complaints to the U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA.

The updated form guides individuals as they file a complaint through the process, providing essential questions at the beginning so they can better understand and exercise their rights under relevant laws. One significant improvement to the system includes pop-up boxes with information about various agencies for individuals who indicate that they have engaged in protected activity that may be addressed by an agency other than OSHA. The new form is available in English and Spanish.

“Workers who report unsafe conditions and wrongdoing have a range of legal protections from retaliation,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt. “The revised online complaint form works to ensure whistleblowers file their complaints with the appropriate federal agency for prompt action.”

In addition to the online form, workers can file complaints by fax, mail, or hand-delivery; contacting the agency at 800-321-6742; or calling an OSHA regional or area office.

OSHA enforces the whistleblower provisions of 22 statutes protecting employees who report violations of various securities laws, trucking, airline, nuclear power, pipeline, environmental, rail, public transportation, workplace safety and health, and consumer protection laws. Detailed information on employee whistleblower rights, including fact sheets, is available online at http://www.whistleblowers.gov/.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

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Per OSHA, Electronic Filing — Requirement Delay to December 1, 2017

Department of Labor, United States of America

News Release


U.S. Department of Labor  |  June 27, 2017

US Labor Department’s OSHA proposes to delay compliance date for electronically submitting injury, illness reports

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration today proposed a delay in the electronic reporting compliance date of the rule, Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses, from July 1, 2017, to Dec. 1, 2017. The proposed delay will allow OSHA an opportunity to further review and consider the rule.

The agency published the final rule on May 12, 2016, and has determined that a further delay of the compliance date is appropriate for the purpose of additional review into questions of law and policy.  The delay will also allow OSHA to provide employers the same four-month window for submitting data that the original rule would have provided.

OSHA invites the public to comment on the proposed deadline extension. Comments may be submitted electronically at www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal, or by mail or facsimile. See the Federal Register notice for details. The deadline for submitting comments is July 13, 2017.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

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Media Contacts:

Amy Louviere, 202-693-9423, louviere.amy@dol.gov
Mandy Kraft, (202) 693-4664, kraft.amanda.c@dol.gov

Release Number:  17-919-NAT

Ergonomics: Standards

On July 20, 2001, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited President George W. Bush’s March 20, 2001, statement as follows:  “The safety and health of our Nation’s workforce is a priority for my administration.  Together we will pursue a comprehensive approach to ergonomics that addresses the concerns surrounding the ergonomics rule repealed today.  We will work with the Congress, the business community, and our Nation’s workers to address this important issue.”

It further states, “With these words, President Bush signed a joint resolution of Congress disapproving OSHA’s ergonomics standard, and at the same time, pledging to find a solution to ergonomic-related problems affecting the nation’s workforce.  OSHA’s ergonomics program standard was issued November 14, 2000, and took effect January 16, 2001.  Congress acted under authority of the Congressional Review Act of 1996.  As a result, the standard is no longer in effect, and employers and workers are not bound by its requirements.”

Today, I checked out OSHA’s web site and it makes no mention of the ergonomics standard being repealed.  It may be part of Obama Care; that is just my guess.  In fact, it is now referred to as the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 with amendments through 2004.

Bottom line is any employers should evaluate their workers for musculoskeletal disorders before they are hired so that they are not found to have an unsafe workplace that causes ergonomic injuries.

Further, for existing employees, if a person has any musculoskeletal pain, go to OSHA.gov to report any Work-related Injuries and Illnesses on their on-line Form 300 (Rev.01/2004) to be on the safe side.  Under OSHA’s General Duty clause, employers can be audited for not reporting a Work-related MSD; but as long as the employer reports the MSD (musculoskeletal disorder), they cannot get audited under the General Duty Clause for not reporting said MSD.  Employers can also call 1-800-321-OSHA to report any potential MSD’s that could be Work-related to make sure you are OSHA compliant.