Beyond the costs of an injury — BWC Blog

A good read about prevention of injury and the need to address health disparities.

By Mark Leung, BWC Technical Medical Specialist, Recently promoted from the BWC Safety & Hygiene Fellowship program Occupational health and safety has been a public health focus for many years. Emphasizing worker protection and well-being advances the overall goal of reducing negative health outcomes in the future. The need to address health disparities within the […]

via Beyond the costs of an injury — BWC Blog

Driving is Risk Factor for Low Back Pain

Occupational Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 3., pp. 153-160, 1998, “Musculoskeletal Problems and Driving in Police Officers,” written by D. E. Gyi and J. M. Porter, Vehicle Ergonomics Group, Department of Design and Technology, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, United Kingdom:

In the above-mentioned study, the Occupational Health Department of a rural police force in the United Kingdom had concerns with relation to driving and its link to musculoskeletal disorders.

“There are now an increasing number of researchers whose work implicates prolonged exposure to car driving as a risk factor for low back pain.  However, such epidemiological studies examining the relationship between car driving and back pain or other musculoskeletal troubles are difficult to conduct.  Driving as a task involves prolonged sitting, a fixed posture, and vibration, any of which could directly lead to musculoskeletal trouble.  It is likely that symptoms arise from multiple relationships and influences, (Rey, P., 1979).”

“These police drivers are also deemed to be at particular risk because of the following:

  • They are generally tall males and wear bulky clothing such that seat adjustment may be insufficient to obtain a good posture.
  • They drive fleet cars where the seat and suspension are exposed to excessive wear and tear.
  • They often have to drive in rapid response situations such that they are exposed to fast acceleration and deceleration.
  • Driving is often followed by strenuous physical activity such as lifting and running.
  • They spend most of their eight-hour shift driving or sitting in their vehicle.
  • They often have to take back-seat passengers, such that tall males are unable to take advantage of any seat adjustments that do exist.”

“In a survey of 2,000 U.S. police officers, the number and types of health disorders reported b these officers over a 6-month period were similar to those found in the general public over a 12 month period, (Hurrel, J., 1984).”

The results of the above-mentioned study agree with the findings of other studies that indicate driving a car is a risk factor for the development of low back pain.

OSHA watch — Premium Reduction Center Blog

Temporary enforcement policy on monorail hoists in construction Employers whose monorail hoists fail to comply with requirements in the Crane and Derricks in Construction Standard will not be issued citations as long as they adhere to other regulations, according to a recent memorandum. The temporary enforcement policy notes stakeholders identified gaps in the standard regarding […]

via OSHA watch — Premium Reduction Center Blog

OSHA Revised Whistleblower Complaint

Trade Release

Department of Labor, United States of America

U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Office of Communications
Washington, D.C.
www.osha.gov

For Immediate Release
July 28, 2017
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

OSHA revises its online whistleblower complaint form

WASHINGTON – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration recently revised its online whistleblower complaint form to help users file a complaint with the appropriate agency. The form provides workers with another option for submitting retaliation complaints to the U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA.

The updated form guides individuals as they file a complaint through the process, providing essential questions at the beginning so they can better understand and exercise their rights under relevant laws. One significant improvement to the system includes pop-up boxes with information about various agencies for individuals who indicate that they have engaged in protected activity that may be addressed by an agency other than OSHA. The new form is available in English and Spanish.

“Workers who report unsafe conditions and wrongdoing have a range of legal protections from retaliation,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt. “The revised online complaint form works to ensure whistleblowers file their complaints with the appropriate federal agency for prompt action.”

In addition to the online form, workers can file complaints by fax, mail, or hand-delivery; contacting the agency at 800-321-6742; or calling an OSHA regional or area office.

OSHA enforces the whistleblower provisions of 22 statutes protecting employees who report violations of various securities laws, trucking, airline, nuclear power, pipeline, environmental, rail, public transportation, workplace safety and health, and consumer protection laws. Detailed information on employee whistleblower rights, including fact sheets, is available online at http://www.whistleblowers.gov/.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

# # #

OSHA Resources on Silica Final Rule

Information from OSHA

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

U.S. Department of Labor

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Office of Communications

202-693-1999

Department of Labor, United States of America

New and revised resources available from OSHA on silica final rule

OSHA has released two resources to help small business employers comply with the agency’s final silica rule. The Small Entity Compliance Guide for General Industry and Maritime outlines steps that employers are required to take including: assessing worker exposures; using engineering and work practice controls to keep exposures below a specified safety threshold; offering medical exams to certain highly exposed workers; and training workers. Enforcement of the final rule is scheduled to begin June 23, 2018.

Released earlier in the year, the Small Entity Compliance Guide for Construction describes requirements to protect employees including: using engineering controls specified in the standard or selecting other effective engineering controls to reduce exposures; offering medical exams to workers who will need to wear a respirator under the silica standard for 30 or more days a year; and training workers. The guide was updated to reflect the new enforcement date of Sept. 23, 2017.

You are receiving this email because you signed up for updates on the agency’s silica rule. To unsubscribe, see below.

OSHA Whistleblower Complaints Contact Office of Communications

Trade Release from OSHA

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

Trade Release

Department of Labor, United States of America

U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Office of Communications
Washington, D.C.
www.osha.gov

For Immediate Release
July 28, 2017
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

OSHA revises its online whistleblower complaint form

WASHINGTON – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration recently revised its online whistleblower complaint form to help users file a complaint with the appropriate agency. The form provides workers with another option for submitting retaliation complaints to the U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA.

The updated form guides individuals as they file a complaint through the process, providing essential questions at the beginning so they can better understand and exercise their rights under relevant laws. One significant improvement to the system includes pop-up boxes with information about various agencies for individuals who indicate that they have engaged in protected activity that may be addressed by an agency other than OSHA. The new form is available in English and Spanish.

“Workers who report unsafe conditions and wrongdoing have a range of legal protections from retaliation,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt. “The revised online complaint form works to ensure whistleblowers file their complaints with the appropriate federal agency for prompt action.”

In addition to the online form, workers can file complaints by fax, mail, or hand-delivery; contacting the agency at 800-321-6742; or calling an OSHA regional or area office.

OSHA enforces the whistleblower provisions of 22 statutes protecting employees who report violations of various securities laws, trucking, airline, nuclear power, pipeline, environmental, rail, public transportation, workplace safety and health, and consumer protection laws. Detailed information on employee whistleblower rights, including fact sheets, is available online at http://www.whistleblowers.gov/.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

# # #


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Trade Release – OSHA – electronically submit injury and illness data on August 1, 2017 – Form 300

OSHA Electronic Filing August 1, 2017

Trade Release

Department of Labor, United States of America

U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Office of Communications
Washington, D.C.
www.osha.gov
For Immediate Release
July 14, 2017
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

OSHA launches application to electronically submit injury and illness data on August 1

WASHINGTON – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration will launch on Aug. 1, 2017, the Injury Tracking Application (ITA). The Web-based form allows employers to electronically submit required injury and illness data from their completed 2016 OSHA Form 300A. The application will be accessible from the ITA webpage.
Last month, OSHA published a notice of proposed rulemaking to extend the deadline for submitting 2016 Form 300A to Dec. 1, 2017, to allow affected entities sufficient time to familiarize themselves with the electronic reporting system, and to provide the new administration an opportunity to review the new electronic reporting requirements prior to their implementation.
The data submission process involves four steps: (1) Creating an establishment; (2) adding 300A summary data; (3) submitting data to OSHA; and (4) reviewing the confirmation email. The secure website offers three options for data submission. One option will enable users to manually enter data into a web form. Another option will give users the ability to upload a CSV file to process single or multiple establishments at the same time. A third option will allow users of automated recordkeeping systems to transmit data electronically via an application programming interface.
The ITA webpage also includes information on reporting requirements, a list of frequently asked questions and a link to request assistance with completing the form.
Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.
# # #

Per OSHA, Electronic Filing — Requirement Delay to December 1, 2017

Department of Labor, United States of America

News Release


U.S. Department of Labor  |  June 27, 2017

US Labor Department’s OSHA proposes to delay compliance date for electronically submitting injury, illness reports

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration today proposed a delay in the electronic reporting compliance date of the rule, Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses, from July 1, 2017, to Dec. 1, 2017. The proposed delay will allow OSHA an opportunity to further review and consider the rule.

The agency published the final rule on May 12, 2016, and has determined that a further delay of the compliance date is appropriate for the purpose of additional review into questions of law and policy.  The delay will also allow OSHA to provide employers the same four-month window for submitting data that the original rule would have provided.

OSHA invites the public to comment on the proposed deadline extension. Comments may be submitted electronically at www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal, or by mail or facsimile. See the Federal Register notice for details. The deadline for submitting comments is July 13, 2017.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

# # #

Media Contacts:

Amy Louviere, 202-693-9423, louviere.amy@dol.gov
Mandy Kraft, (202) 693-4664, kraft.amanda.c@dol.gov

Release Number:  17-919-NAT

Musculoskeletal Pain = Leading Cause of Early Pensions

Textbook of Pain, 1998, “Prevention of Disability due to Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain,” written by Steven James Linton:

The above-mentioned chapter in the Textbook of Pain, “examines procedures designed for use in health-care settings to prevent disability due to musculoskeletal pain.”

The following statement is made:

“Because musculoskeletal pain is a major source of suffering, health care, and utilization of compensation, there is a definite need for prevention.  However, prevention is not an easy task because disability is related to a developmental process in which multidimensional factors operate over time to produce significant lifestyle changes.  Research on risk factors indicates that although medical and workplace factors are obvious, psychosocial variables are central to the transition from acute to chronic pain.  The early identification of ‘at-risk’ patients is a key to allocating resources and initiating secondary prevention.”

“Unfortunately, we do not yet understand the exact mechanisms that produce musculoskeletal pain.”

ACUTE PAIN

“Acute pain – Pain which is generally defined as pain up to about three weeks is characterized by temporary decreases in activity, reliance on medication, and help-seeking.  It is accompanied by psychological distress; for example, fear, anxiety and worry, in addition to beliefs that pain is controllable through medical and active coping…The patient may have organic findings as well as muscle spasms.

SUBACUTE PAIN

“Subacute pain – Pain which is considered to be between 3 and 12 weeks.  Patients may exhibit altering patterns of increasing and decreasing activity, and withdraw or become reliant on medication.”

PERSISTENT OR CHRONIC PAIN

“Persistent or chronic pain – Pain which is defined as more than 3 months’ duration, activities may have decreased sharply. . .The pain becomes more constant although patients may experience ‘good’ and ‘bad’ periods.”

RECURRENT MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN

“Musculoskeletal pain is usually recurrent in nature.  While most episodes of back pain remit rather quickly and most people return to work within 6 weeks, (Reid, et al., 1997), the majority of sufferers will experience several episodes of pain during the course of a year, (Frymoyer, 1992; Nachemson, 1992; VonKorff, 1994; Linton & Hallden, 1997).”

50 % OF ACUTE BACK PAIN SUFFERERS HAVE PAIN 6 – 12 MONTHS LATER

“More than 50 percent of patients with acute back pain will experience another episode within a year (Nachemson, 1992), and prospective studies indicate that almost half will still have significant problems 6 – 12 months later, (Philips & Grant, 1991; VonKorff, 1994; Linton & Hallden, 1997).”

MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN = LEADING CAUSE OF EARLY PENSIONS

“Firstly, a large number of people suffer from musculoskeletal pain, making it a leading health-care problem even though only a minority develop persistent dysfunction.  Musculoskeletal pain is a leading cause of health-care visits, particularly in primary care,  sick absenteeism, and early pensions, (Frymoyer, 1992; Nachemson, 1992; Skovron, 1992).  However, several studies indicate that over 90 percent of those off work with an acute episode of back pain will return within 3 months, (Waddell, 1996;  Reid, et al., 1997).”

“Secondly, as shown above, musculoskeletal pain is recurrent in nature even though most patients return to work rather quickly after an acute episode.  Although acute sufferers usually feel better and return to work within a few weeks, this does not mean that they have recovered fully or permanently.”

“Thirdly, while up to 85 percent of the population will suffer from musculoskeletal pain, only a small number will account for most of the costs, (Nachemson, 1992; Skovron, 1992; Waddell, 1996).  In general, less than 10 percent of the sufferers may consume up to 75 percent of the resources, (VonKorff, 1994; Reid, et al., 1997).  Thus preventing disability and high-cost cases may result in large economic savings, so that these people constitute a special target for prevention programs.”

MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN IN SWEDEN & THE NETHERLANDS

“Further, most of the money at this time is spent on compensation, while relatively little is spent on treatment, and almost nothing is invested in prevention.  In Sweden, about 85 percent of the total resources for musculoskeletal pain are spent on compensation as compared to 15 percent for all treatments and drugs, a figure which has remained fairly constant over a 15-year period, (Linton, 1998).”

“Similarly, in The Netherlands, a recent study of all costs due to back pain showed that 93 percent involved compensation and only 7 percent involved treatment, (Van Tulder, et al., 1995).”

PREVENTION NEEDS RESOURCES

“Consequently, until prevention is granted more resources, programs need to be relatively cheap; and this suggests incorporating them into existing practice routines.”

ERGONOMIC RISK FACTORS TO PREVENT

“A host of ergonomic factors, for example, lifting, heavy work, twisting, bending, manual handling, and repetitive work have been found to be associated with musculoskeletal pain, (Pope, et al., 1991; Skovron, 1992).”

“A recent review of some 60 studies revealed a relationship between musculoskeletal pain problems and job demands, control, monotonous work, time pressure, and perceived workload, (Bongers, et al., 1993).”

“If the problem does not remit within 2 – 4 weeks, a formal screening procedure is suggested.”

 

 

Driving = Risk factor for Low Back Pain

Occupational Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 3., pp. 153-160, 1998, “Musculoskeletal Problems and Driving in Police Officers,” written by D. E. Gyi and J. M. Porter, Vehicle Ergonomics Group, Department of Design and Technology, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, United Kingdom:

In the above-mentioned study, the Occupational Health Department of a rural police force in the United Kingdom had concerns with relation to driving and its link to musculoskeletal disorders.

“There are now an increasing number of researchers whose work implicates prolonged exposure to car driving as a risk factor for low back pain.  However, such epidemiological studies examining the relationship between car driving and back pain or other musculoskeletal troubles are difficult to conduct.  Driving as a task involves prolonged sitting, a fixed posture, and vibration, any of which could directly lead to musculoskeletal trouble.  It is likely that symptoms arise from multiple relationships and influences, (Rey, P., 1979).”

“These police drivers are also deemed to be at particular risk because of the following:

  • They are generally tall males and wear bulky clothing such that seat adjustment may be insufficient to obtain a good posture.
  • They drive fleet cars where the seat and suspension are exposed to excessive wear and tear.
  • They often have to drive in rapid response situations such that they are exposed to fast acceleration and deceleration.
  • Driving is often followed by strenuous physical activity such as lifting and running.
  • They spend most of their eight-hour shift driving or sitting in their vehicle.
  • They often have to take back-seat passengers, such that tall males are unable to take advantage of any seat adjustments that do exist.”

“In a survey of 2,000 U.S. police officers, the number and types of health disorders reported b these officers over a 6-month period were similar to those found in the general public over a 12 month period, (Hurrel, J., 1984).”

The results of the above-mentioned study agree with the findings of other studies that indicate driving a car is a risk factor for the development of low back pain.